DRY SKIN

Do you have rough, tight, peeling or itchy skin? Although dry skin can be very uncomfortable, you can treat this common problem. Find out how. 



YOUR SKIN NEEDS WATER!

The role of the skin is to act as a barrier against the outside world. The skin is made up of three layers: the epidermis, dermis, and hypodermis. The superficial layer is the epidermis, which exchanges water and oxygen with the outside environment.

Dry skin, which is also called xerosis, occurs when too much water evaporates from the skin or when water doesn’t penetrate into the deeper layers of the skin to nourish the epidermis.

HOW TO TELL IF YOUR PROBLEM IS INDEED DRY SKIN

Dry skin tends to get red easily, lacks suppleness and becomes rough. It can also cause itching. The hands, face, lips, legs and arms are the parts of the body most often affected. 

WHAT CAUSES DRY SKIN?

Many factors can cause dry skin:

  • Prolonged exposure to heat or a very dry environment.
  • Very hot baths or showers.
  • Synthetic fabrics or wool worn directly on the skin.
  • Heavily scented detergents or skin care products.
  • Some skin conditions (such as eczema).
  • Some medications.

HOW TO TREAT DRY SKIN

Lifestyle

  • Drink 6 to 8 glasses of water a day to compensate for water loss and prevent dehydration.  
  • Eat a healthy diet. Consult Canada's Food Guide to ensure you eat a balanced diet that includes small amounts of good fats.
  • Don’t smoke. Smoking is the enemy of beautiful, healthy skin. If you need help to quit smoking, don't hesitate to ask your pharmacist.  
  • Get regular physical activity. This promotes blood circulation and provides water and oxygen to the skin.

     

  • Keep the humidity in your house at the proper level.

     

     

    Skin care

     

  • Apply a moisturizing cream or lotion twice a day, including once on wet skin after your bath or shower. Your pharmacist can help you choose from the many dry skin products available at the pharmacy.

     

  • Protect your skin from the sun(lien vers fiche protection solaire) by wearing sunscreen.

     

    Baths and showers

     

    • Take warm baths or showers. Make sure the water isn't too hot or too cold.

       

    • Limit the time you spend in the shower or bathtub.  
    • Use a mild or “extra-moisturizing” soap that is non-alkaline and unscented.  
    • You can also add a moisturizing oil to your bath, but avoid bubble baths.   
    • Dry your skin by dabbing it with a towel; don’t rub your skin too hard.

       

       

      Clothing

       

    • Avoid clothing made with irritating fibres, like wool. Wear soft fabrics like cotton, linen or silk.

 

Choose a mild laundry soap and fabric softener

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