Prescribing a medication for minor ailments

To get a prescription from your pharmacist, you must have the same symptoms that you had when you went to see your doctor or specialized nurse practitioner (SNP) and for which you've already received a diagnosis and a prescription. 
Before prescribing the medication, your pharmacist will meet with you to go over your situation, your health condition and your medication record to make sure your treatment is still appropriate. Otherwise, your pharmacist may advise you that the best solution is for you to go back to see your doctor or SNP.

Once your prescription is filled, your pharmacist will tell you how to use it properly and give you tips to prevent the problem from coming back . Your pharmacist will also follow up with you a few days later to make sure the prescribed medication is effective for you.

This service is offered for the following health conditions:

 Minor acne    Eczema (mild to moderate)  Bladder infections in women
 Mouth ulcers (canker sores)  Diaper rash  Thrush (from corticosteroid inhaler use)
 Allergic conjunctivitis  Hemorrhoids   Allergic rhinitis
 Menstrual pain   Oral herpes  Vaginal yeast infections

 

Minor acne

Acne is a skin problem that affects many people, but mainly teenagers and young adults. If your topical acne medication has expired, your pharmacist can renew this prescription under certain conditions. For example, your initial medical assessment can't date back more than 4 years.

During the consultation, your pharmacist will assess the severity of your acne, the effectiveness of your prescription, how you use it, and any side effects. Your pharmacist can then decide whether to renew your prescription or whether you should consult your doctor.

Mouth ulcers

Mouth ulcers (or cankers) are small sores inside the mouth. They can be painful and may make chewing or speaking very uncomfortable. They generally heal on their own within 7 to 10 days. To relieve your discomfort, your pharmacist can recommend an over-the-counter (OTC) product to ease pain and speed up healing.

Your pharmacist can also renew a prescription for mouth ulcers under certain conditions. For example, your initial medical assessment can't date back more than 4 years. During the consultation, your pharmacist will ensure that you indeed have an ulcer (and not an abscess) and that you don't have other symptoms that would warrant a visit to your doctor. Finally, your pharmacist will tell you how to properly use the recommended medication and will let you know about daily care  to help you prevent or relieve your mouth ulcers.

Allergic conjunctivitis

Conjunctivitis is an inflammation of the conjunctiva of the eye that causes redness inside the lower eyelid and on part of the white of the eye. This condition can have several causes, from an infection to an allergy. Allergic conjunctivitis is when symptoms are caused by contact with an allergen (e.g., pollen, dust or animal hair).

OTC medications can relieve conjunctivitis symptoms. However, note that “red eye” drops aren't always the best choice as they can be habit-forming. Ask your pharmacist for advice.

Also, your doctor may have already prescribed a medication to relieve your allergic conjunctivitis symptoms. Your pharmacist can renew this prescription or prescribe an equivalent medication under certain conditions. For example, your initial medical assessment can't date back more than 4 years.

During your consultation, your pharmacist will ensure your conjunctivitis has indeed been caused by an allergy (and not an infection), that you don't have symptoms that warrant a medical consultation, and that the prescribed product is effective for you and well tolerated. Finally, your pharmacist will give you advice on how to properly use the product and what to do to help relieve your conjunctivitis.

Menstrual pain

Menstrual pain includes cramps and other uncomfortable symptoms that can be debilitating for some women.

A number of OTC medications can relieve menstrual pain. These products aren't all the same in terms of their effectiveness and possible side effects, so you should talk to your pharmacist before choosing one.

Your doctor may have already prescribed a medication to relieve your menstrual pain. Your pharmacist can renew your prescription for this medication under certain conditions. For example, your initial medical assessment can't date back more than 2 years.

During the consultation, your pharmacist will ensure the prescribed medication is still right for you, that your health condition hasn't changed since your last medical check-up, that the prescribed drug provided you with relief, and that you tolerated it. Your pharmacist can also give you tips that can help relieve your symptoms.

Eczema

Eczema is a condition that generally occurs as redness, irritation, itching or dry patches on the skin.

Skin care measures such as keeping the skin hydrated with a moisturizing or protective cream and avoiding irritating or scented products can prevent or limit eczema outbreaks. However, you may find that general care isn't enough to relieve your symptoms. Your doctor may have already prescribed a treatment (such as a cortisone cream or ointment) to relieve your eczema. Your pharmacist can renew this prescription under certain conditions. For example, your initial medical evaluation can’t date back more than 4 years, and your prescription must be for a low to moderate concentration.

During the consultation, your pharmacist will check that your health condition hasn't changed since your last medical check-up and that the prescribed medication is still right for you (i.e., it provided you with relief and you tolerated it). Your pharmacist can also give you tips about daily care that can help relieve your symptoms.

Diaper rash

Diaper rash is a skin irritation in the diaper area in children or the area under incontinence pants in adults. Several factors can trigger or worsen these rashes: moisture, prolonged contact with urine and stool, or the use of scented products or irritants.

There are things you can do to prevent or reduce diaper rash. First, the area should be changed as soon as it becomes soiled. Gently cleanse the region with a mild, unscented soap (or a cleanser free of irritants and perfumes), and then dry it without rubbing. You can also apply a protective ointment to create a barrier between the skin and urine. Don’t hesitate to ask your pharmacist for advice to choose the best product for you.

Your doctor may have already prescribed a diaper rash medication for you or your child. Your pharmacist can renew this prescription under certain conditions. For example, your initial medical assessment can't date back more than 4 years.

During the consultation, your pharmacist will ensure that the affected person doesn’t have symptoms that require a medical consultation and that the prescribed medication is still appropriate. Your pharmacist will also follow up with you after a few days to check that the symptoms have improved.

Hemorrhoids

Hemorrhoids are veins in the rectal area. People say that they “have hemorrhoids” when these veins get swollen or painful.

A number of OTC and prescription products can relieve hemorrhoids. Before choosing one, talk to your pharmacist, who will give you the medication that is best for your needs and can give you daily care tips to keep your hemorrhoids at bay.

Your doctor may have already prescribed a treatment for your hemorrhoids. Your pharmacist can renew this prescription under certain conditions. For example, your initial medical assessment can't date back more than 2 years.

During the consultation, your pharmacist will check that your health condition hasn't changed since your last medical evaluation and that the prescribed medication is still right for you (i.e., it provided you with relief and you tolerated it). Your pharmacist will also follow up with you after a few days to check that your symptoms have improved.

Oral herpes

Oral herpes, also called “fever blisters” or “cold sores,” is very common, highly contagious and very inconvenient, which is why you should treat it quickly as soon as the first symptoms appear. You can treat oral herpes with OTC products, but prescription medications are generally more effective.

Your doctor may have already prescribed a medication for your oral herpes. Your pharmacist can renew this prescription under certain conditions. For example, your initial medical assessment can't date back more than 4 years.

During the consultation, your pharmacist will check that your health condition hasn't changed since your last medical evaluation and that the prescribed medication is still right for you (i.e., it provided you with relief and you tolerated it). Your pharmacist may also give you tips on daily care that can help prevent or relieve cold sores. Your pharmacist will also follow up with you after a few days to check that your symptoms have improved.

Urinary tract infections in women

Urinary tract infections (UTI), or bladder infections, are common in women. A UTI has easily recognizable symptoms. This type of infection is generally caused by bacteria, and antibiotics are the only medications that can cure it.

If you are experiencing symptoms of a UTI, your pharmacist can prescribe an antibiotic under certain conditions. For example, no more than 12 months can have gone by since the check-up when your doctor prescribed an antibiotic, and you must not have had more than 3 infections during this period.

Before prescribing the treatment, your pharmacist will talk with you to ensure your symptoms are indeed consistent with a UTI. He or she will also check that you don't have contraindications for antibiotic prescriptions (i.e., because of your medical condition). If you do, your pharmacist will advise you to consult your doctor. If antibiotic treatment is appropriate, your pharmacist will tell you how to use it properly and will follow up with you after a few days to check that your symptoms have improved.

Thrush (from corticosteroid inhaler use)

Thrush is a mouth infection that causes white or red patches on the tongue or inside the cheeks. This infection can be unpleasant and painful and is a side effect of inhaler use in people who suffer from asthma or chronic lung disease. You should rinse your mouth after using these inhalers to reduce this side effect.

Your doctor may have already prescribed a medication for your thrush. Your pharmacist can renew this prescription under certain conditions. For example, your initial medical assessment can't date back more than 4 years.

During the consultation, your pharmacist will check that your health condition hasn't changed since your last medical evaluation and that the prescribed medication is still right for you (i.e., it provided you with relief and you tolerated it). Your pharmacist may also give you tips on daily care that can help prevent or relieve your thrush. Your pharmacist will also follow up with you after a few days to check that your symptoms have improved.

Allergic rhinitis

Allergic rhinitis, or just “allergies” is common, especially during the summer. People who are allergic to pollen will suffer from sneezing, a runny nose and itchy eyes. These symptoms may also occur from contact with other types of allergens, such as animal hair or mites.

Antihistamines (which are OTC allergy medications) are generally effective at preventing or relieving allergy symptoms. However, sometimes these products aren't enough. If OTC medications don't work, your doctor may have given you a prescription for a more powerful antihistamine or a nasal spray. Your pharmacist can renew this prescription under certain conditions. For example, your initial medical assessment can't date back more than 4 years.

During the consultation, your pharmacist will check that your health condition hasn't changed since your last medical evaluation and that the prescribed medication is still right for you (i.e., it provided you with relief and you tolerated it). Your pharmacist will also give you tips on daily care that can help you. Your pharmacist will also follow up with you after a few days to check that your symptoms have improved.

Vaginal yeast infections

Vaginal yeast infections are a common infection  in women. Most women will get a yeast infection at least once in their lives, and some will get them more often.

OTC medications are usually effective at treating yeast infections. However, make sure you talk to your pharmacist for advice to choose the right product for you, depending on your symptoms and health condition.

Your doctor may have already prescribed a medication for your yeast infections. Your pharmacist can renew this prescription under certain conditions. For example, your initial medical assessment can't date back more than 4 years.

During the consultation, your pharmacist will check that your health condition hasn't changed since your last medical evaluation and that the prescribed medication is still right for you (i.e., it provided you with relief and you tolerated it). Your pharmacist may also give you tips on daily care that can help prevent or relieve your yeast infection. Your pharmacist will also follow up with you after a few days to check that your symptoms have improved.